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Destination Guides


England

General   Weather   Airports   Attractions   Activities  

Introduction

Devon's moors, England ©dennisredfield

The heart of the British Empire and the United Kingdom has always been England. A tiny country in comparison to the United States or even France, it has nevertheless had a huge impact on the history of the world.


All the regions of England are easily accessible from the invigorating capital city of London, famous for its history, culture and pageantry. In the north of England, lakes, mountains, castles and craggy coastlines create scenic splendour; a little further south the medieval city of York contrasts with lively Liverpool and Manchester, once famous as powerhouses of the Victorian industrial revolution and now known for their football teams, live music scenes and exhausting nightlife.


Visitors travelling south will discover the quintessential English landscape, where a tranquil air blows through country lanes or across shimmering fens, while the gleaming spires of Oxford stand proudly above a university town that's changed little over the centuries. South of London, the 'Garden of England' stretches out with bountiful farmlands to the coast, where visitors will find charming seaside resorts and fishing villages. From the Cotswolds to the craggy coast of Cornwall, the West Country offers an idyllic pastoral experience, with honey-coloured stone houses, charming thatched cottages and narrow roads winding through lush, rolling green fields.


With its pomp and pageantry, wonderful idiosyncrasies and vibrant diversity, today's England is friendly, welcoming, fascinating and fun.


Climate Info

England has four distinct seasons but the weather is changeable and unpredictable. Summers are warm and winters are cold, but temperatures are milder than on the continent. England is warmer on average than the rest of the UK and gets more sun and less rain throughout the year on average, but it is still frequently damp and a bit dismal weather-wise. Temperatures do not usually drop much below 32°F (0°C) in winter, and in summer they rarely exceed 90°F (32°C). July and August are the warmest months, although they are also the wettest, while January and February are the coldest months of the year. Rainfall is fairly evenly distributed throughout the year, but late winter/early spring (February to March) is the driest period. Most people prefer to visit England between April and October, when the days are pleasantly long and the weather is mild.


Birmingham Airport (BHX)

LocationThe airport is situated eight miles (12km) southeast of Birmingham.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 between the last Sunday in March and the Saturday before the last Sunday in October).
Transfer terminals

The two terminals are within easy walking distance of each other.

Getting to city

Buses to the city centre and surrounds can be caught opposite the airport at the Bus and Coach Terminus. Birmingham city centre can also be reached via Birmingham International railway station connected to the airport by a free monorail system called the Air-Rail Link. Trains run from Birmingham International Station to Birmingham New Street Station and vice versa throughout the day but are less frequent in the evenings and on weekends. For onward travel, Birmingham International Station is connected to over 100 towns in and around the UK.

Car Rental

Car rental companies include Avis, Budget, Europcar, Hertz and National. All car hire booking desks are located within the arrivals lounge which can be found easily once through security.

Airpor Taxis

Taxis are available from outside passenger terminals and take about 15-20 minutes into Birmingham.

Airport Facilities

There are banks, bureaux de change, shops, restaurants, business lounges, baby changing facilities and a tourist information desk in the airport. Disabled facilities are good; those with special needs should contact their airline in advance.

Car Parking

The airport's 'drop and go' area is adjacent to the departures terminal and is charged per ten minutes. Car parks 1, 2 and 3 are best for short and medium-stay parking; they are located beside the terminal building and charge per hour or per day. The long-stay parking garages are located next to the second roundabout along Airport Way, a ten-minute walk from the terminal. There are regular shuttle-buses between the long stay parking lots and the terminal. Long-stay parking is free for the first 15 minutes.

Websitewww.birminghamairport.co.uk


Bristol International Airport (BRS)

LocationThe airport is situated eight miles (13km) southwest of Bristol city centre.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October).
Getting to city

Bristol International Flyer Express buses depart for the city centre (including the train station) around the clock, every eight minutes during peak hours, and every 30 minutes off-peak. It costs around £7 for a one-way ticket. Taxis are also available outside the terminal.

Car Rental

Car hire companies include Avis, Europcar, Hertz and National, among others.

Airpor Taxis

Arrow Cars taxis are available all day and night at the airport, located outside the terminal building. Passengers can visit the booking desk where they will be quoted a fixed fare and allocated a taxi. Payment can be made by card at the booking desk, or by cash to the driver.

Airport Facilities

Facilities at Bristol Airport include a bureau de change, ATM, bars, restaurants, shops, an executive lounge and tourist information desk. Disabled facilities are good; those with special needs are advised to contact their airline in advance.

Car Parking

There is short and long-term car parking available. Spaces can be pre-booked via the airport website.

Websitewww.bristolairport.com


Leeds Bradford International Airport (LBA)

LocationThe airport is situated nine miles (14km) northwest of Leeds.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)113 250 9696.

Getting to city

The bus services run frequently from the airport to Leeds and Bradford city centre bus and rail stations. The bus services link the airport to Leeds City Rail Station, from where connections can be made to all parts of the UK.

Car Rental

Avis, Europcar and Hertz are represented in International Arrivals.

Airpor Taxis

Arrow Cars are available from the airport taxi rank outside the terminal building.

Airport Facilities

Facilities at the airport include banks, ATMs, bureaux de change and a tourist information desk. There are also shops, bars and restaurants. The Yorkshire Premier Lounge on the first floor of the Departure Lounge offers a full bar service, complimentary newspapers, high-speed wifi and telephones. Entry to the lounge is through membership or a once off entry fee of around £20. Disabled facilities are good; those with special needs should contact their airline in advance.

Car Parking

There is short- and long-term car parking available. Parking can be booked in advance on the airport website. There is a courtesy bus service between the long-stay car park and the terminal building, operating 24 hours a day. Passengers should allow extra time to park and get to the terminal.

Websitewww.lbia.co.uk


Liverpool John Lennon Airport (LPL)

LocationThe airport is situated seven miles (11km) southeast of Liverpool.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 between the last Sunday in March and the Saturday before the last Sunday in October).
Getting to city

Airlink buses operate to the city centre and to local rail and bus stations for further travel. Buses leave from the front of the Airport Terminal Building. Liverpool South Parkway is the nearest rail station to the Airport serving the local/regional rail network. Liverpool Lime Street services local, regional and mainland services. Both have bus links with the Airport. Taxis are also available.

Car Rental

Car rental companies include National, Europcar, Hertz, Avis and Enterprise.

Airport Facilities

There are shops, bars and restaurants at the airport. Other facilities include bureaux de change, children's play areas, wifi and internet kiosks, business facilities (including fax and internet) and tourist information. Disabled facilities are good; those with special needs should contact their airline in advance.

Car Parking

Short-term parking at Liverpool John Lennon Airport is charged at £5 for the first hour, £7 for two hours, £13 for four hours, £25 for 12 hours and £30 per day. Long-term parking starts at £30 per day, and charges £45 for two days, £55 for three days, and £5 per day thereafter.

Depature TaxNone.
Websitewww.liverpoolairport.com


London City Airport (LCY)

LocationThe airport is situated at the Royal Docks, 10 miles (16km) from the West End.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 from last Sunday in March to Saturday before last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)20 7646 0088.

Getting to city

Docklands Light Railway (DLR) departs from London City Airport every 8-15 minutes to Canning Town, Woolwich Arsenal and Bank. There are regular Transport for London buses from the airport to stations throughout London. Nearby National Rail stations are reached via the Jubilee line from Canning Town (a seven-minute DLR journey). Licensed taxis (black cabs) are available outside the terminal building, a taxi to the centre of London will take only 20 to 30 minutes and cost roughly £20. Car rental desks are situated on the ground floor. There are also chauffeur services available from Quay Cars.

Car Rental

Car rental desks are situated on the ground floor, rental companies include Avis, Europcar and Hertz.

Airpor Taxis

Taxis from London City Airport can be hailed outside the Arrivals Hall and a taxi to the centre of London will take only 20 to 30 minutes and cost roughly £20. A taxi to Canary Wharf will cost £12.

Airport Facilities

There are shops, bars and a restaurant at City Airport, other facilities include left luggage, a mother and baby room, tourist information and business facilities including Internet and fax. There are also ATMs, a bureau de change and Internet facilities. The disabled facilities are good; those with special needs should ideally inform their airline in advance.

Car Parking

Parking at London City Airport is located within easy walking distance of the terminal. Short-term parking starts at £4.20 for the first half hour, £8.40 for up to an hour, £12.60 for two hours, £18.90 for four hours, £29.20 for up to 12 hours and £45 per day. The Main Stay car park starts at £14.70 for up to four hours, £25.20 for up to 12 hours, and £40 per day. Credit card facilities are available.

Depature TaxNone.
Websitewww.londoncityairport.com


London Gatwick Airport (LGW)

LocationThe airport is situated 28 miles (45km) south of London.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 from last Sunday in March to Saturday before last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)870 000 2468.

Transfer terminals

The two terminals are linked by the Inter Terminal Transit train that leaves every three minutes.

Getting to city

The easiest and quickest way into London from Gatwick is on the Gatwick Express train, which takes 30 minutes to the central Victoria railway station. Local buses call at both terminals and run between Gatwick and key destinations including Crawley, Horley, Redhill and Horsham. Taxis are also available from the airport into town, while coaches take passengers to destinations including Heathrow, central London, Bristol and Brighton (ticket desks are in the North and South Terminals). Car rental companies operate from both terminals.

Car Rental

Car rental companies such as Avis, Budget, Europcar and Hertz operate from both terminals.

Airpor Taxis

Taxis from Gatwick Airport are available outside the Arrivals Hall and a taxi to London city centre will take roughly an hour to an hour-and-a-half as this road can be very busy.

Airport Facilities

Both terminals have shops, restaurants, bars, left luggage, bureaux de change, ATMs, an Internet café, baby changing rooms and children's play areas. In the South Terminal there is a post office, a medical centre offering vaccinations, and the BAA Conference and Business Centre, which provides meeting rooms, videoconferencing, fax, photocopy, Internet access and secretarial services. Disabled facilities at the airport are good; those who require special assistance should contact their airline in advance.

Car Parking

Short-term and long-term parking is available and a free shuttle services the parking areas farther away from the terminal building.

Depature TaxNone.
Websitewww.gatwickairport.com


London Heathrow Airport (LHR)

LocationThe airport is situated 15 miles (24km) west of London.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 from last Sunday in March to the last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)8700 000 123.

Transfer terminals

Terminal 1 is no longer in use. Terminals 2 and 3 are within walking distance of each other, with an average walking time of 11 minutes from one end to the other. Terminals 4 and 5 are connected via the free Heathrow Express train. Allow around 15 minutes for the journey time between terminals.

Getting to city

The quickest way into London is on the Heathrow Express train, which leaves every 15 minutes for Paddington station, takes 15 minutes, and costs £22 if booked online or at a ticket machine, or £27 on-board. Paddington has good connections to the other London railway stations and all parts of London via the London Underground. Heathrow is also on the Piccadilly underground line, which takes passengers into central London in around 50 minutes. The National Express coach service runs to central London and other towns and cities throughout the UK.

Car Rental

Car rental options include Avis, Budget, Europcar, Hertz, National and Sixt.

Airpor Taxis

London's black taxis service Heathrow Airport; the journey time to central London is around 30-60 minutes, depending on traffic. Taxis are metered, but pre-booked fares to central London start from £40 fixed rate. Taxis are available from outside each terminal.

Airport Facilities

There are numerous shops, bars and restaurants, ATMs, currency exchange facilities, left luggage facilities, pharmacies and postal services in all terminals. A spa offering massages is located in Terminal 5. There are VIP Lounges in Terminals 2 and 3. There are multi-faith prayer rooms in each terminal and St George's Chapel is located close to the central bus station between Terminals 2 and 3. There are shower facilities located in Terminal 3.

Car Parking

Short-term parking is available adjacent to the airport. A free shuttle service links the terminals and the long-term and business car parks. Valet parking is also available at all terminals.

Websitewww.heathrowairport.com


London Luton Airport (LTN)

LocationThe airport is situated 32 miles (52km) northwest of London.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 from last Sunday in March to Saturday before last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)1582 405 100.

Getting to city

Trains leave regularly to Kings Cross, Farringdon, City Thameslink, Blackfriars and London Bridge stations. Train journeys to central London take 20-25 minutes with providers such as East Midlands Trains and First Capital Connect. Tickets can be bought from the Onward Travel centre at the airport or online. Luton Airport Parkway Train Station is connected to the terminal by a free shuttle bus service. Easybus, Green Line and National Express buses run daily between the airport and central London. Taxis operate from outside the airport terminal 24-hours a day and car rental is also available.

Car Rental

Car rental companies include Avis, Hertz, Europcar and National Alamo.

Airpor Taxis

Taxis operate from Luton Airport 24-hours a day and can be hailed outside the Arrivals Hall. A taxi to central London will cost anywhere between £60 and £90 and will take approximately 2 hours.

Airport Facilities

Facilities at the airport include shops, bars, restaurants, bureaux de change, ATMs, a children's play area and baby changing rooms. Facilities for the disabled are good; those with special needs are advised to contact their airline or travel agent in advance.

Car Parking

There is short-term parking, and 'executive' parking next to the terminal. Long-term (valet) parking operates near the terminal - your car will be taken away to another compound while you are away. Passengers who book in advance via the airport website get discounted parking rates.

Depature TaxNone.
Websitewww.london-luton.com


London Stansted Airport (STN)

LocationThe airport is situated 34 miles (55km) northeast of London.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 from last Sunday in March to Saturday before last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)844 335 1803.

Getting to city

The Stansted Express rail service operates between London's Liverpool Street station and the airport, taking approximately 45 minutes. There are also bus and coach services to Victoria Coach Station, Heathrow and Gatwick airports, among other London and national destinations. The bus and coach station is opposite the main terminal entrance. Coach tickets are available from the ticket desk in arrivals and at the station; a ticket to Victoria costs £10.50. Taxis are available outside the terminal building and car rental is also available.

Car Rental

Car rental companies available at the airport include Avis, Budget, Europcar, Alamo, National, Enterprise and Hertz.

Airpor Taxis

The following taxi services operate from London Stansted Airport: Stansted Taxi Service (01279 816901), Stansted Airport Cars (08456 436705), Stansted Chauffeurs (08444 481 481) and 24 7 Stansted(01279 661111). You'll find the operators in the arrivals area. A taxi to central London from Stansted Airport will cost in the region of £100.

Airport Facilities

There are a number of popular restaurants, shops and bars in the terminal, both before and after security. Other facilities include ATMs, a bureau de change and Internet cafe. There are VIP lounges for international travellers at gates 16 and 49, which can be booked via the airport's website. There are also shower facilities at both arrivals and departures, with towels and access available for a small fee at the airport information desk. There is a multi-faith chapel near Check-in Zone J, accessible after security. Disabled facilities are good; those with special needs should contact their airline or travel agent in advance. Stansted is a smoke-free airport, and there are no smoking facilities past security.

Car Parking

The short-term parking is located next to the terminal building. Long-term parking is further away and is linked to the airport by a free shuttle bus; passengers should allow an extra 30 minutes to access the terminal from the car parks. The airport also offers valet parking. Travellers who pre-book on the Stansted Airport website receive discounted car parking.

Websitewww.stanstedairport.com


Manchester International Airport (MAN)

LocationThe airport is situated 10 miles (17km) southwest of Manchester city centre.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 from last Sunday in March to last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)161 489 8000.

Transfer terminals

The Skylink travellator system links Terminals 1 and 2, while 1 and 3 are linked by an external walkway.

Getting to city

There are regular trains between the airport and Manchester Piccadilly railway station, which has connections to destinations throughout the UK. Buses service Manchester city centre as well as other local towns and cities. National Express operates coach services to cities all over the UK. All buses, coaches and trains leave from The Station, the airport's new transport interchange that is connected to all terminals by a covered walkway. Taxis are available outside all terminals.

Car Rental

Car rental companies include Avis, Budget, Europcar, Hertz, National and Sixt.

Airpor Taxis

Taxis are available outside all terminals. Fares into Manchester are determined by the meter, while other destinations may be charged at a flat rate.

Airport Facilities

There are restaurants, shops and bars in all three terminals. Other facilities include ATMs, bureaux de change and left luggage. Disabled facilities are good; those with special needs should inform their airline or travel agent in advance.

Car Parking

Short-term and long-term parking at Manchester International Airport is available. It is a good idea to book parking in advance via the airport's website in the peak summer season, as the car park can be full.

Websitewww.manchesterairport.co.uk


Newcastle International Airport (NCL)

LocationThe airport is situated six miles (10km) from Newcastle city centre.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 from last Sunday in March to last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)871 882 1121.

Getting to city

The Metro system connects the airport to Newcastle Central Station, and other parts of the city, leaving every few minutes. Buses also leave regularly for the Eldon Square Bus Concourse.

Car Rental

Car hire companies represented at the airport include Avis, Europcar, Hertz and Interrent.

Airpor Taxis

Taxis are available outside the terminal.

Airport Facilities

Newcastle Airport has shops, bars and restaurants. Other facilities include a bank, bureaux de change, ATMs, left luggage, baby care rooms, and a children's play area. Disabled facilities are good; those with special needs are advised to inform their airline or travel agent in advance.

Car Parking

The short-stay and express parking lots are located directly opposite the terminal. The medium-stay lot, just beyond, offers 15 minutes free parking for picking up or dropping off passengers. The long-term lots are located furthest from the terminal and offer the cheapest daily and weekly rates. Discounted rates are available for bookings made via the airport website.

Websitewww.newcastleairport.com


Nottingham East Midlands Airport (EMA)

LocationThe airport is situated 11 miles (18km) from Derby. It is in easy reach of Nottingham, Leicester and Derby by road and public transport.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 from last Sunday in March to Saturday before last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)871 919 9000.

Getting to city

Visitors heading for Nottingham can use the direct Nottingham Skylink bus service, which runs half-hourly around the clock between the airport and Nottingham Railway Station. Taxis are freely available, the fare to Nottingham being £26. Journey time to central Nottingham is about half an hour.

Car Rental

Car hire desks in the arrivals hall are available for Enterprise, Europcar, National and Hertz car rental.

Airport Facilities

The airport has a Travelex outlet for foreign exchange and a range of shops, including newsagent, chemist, souvenir shop and duty free outlets. There are several restaurants and fast-food eateries in the terminal building. There are public telephones, Internet kiosks and Wi-Fi hotspots available. The airport also has an executive lounge.

Car Parking

Short-term and long-term parking is available. Shuttle buses operate between the car parks and the terminal.

Depature TaxNone.
Websitewww.eastmidlandsairport.com


Norwich International Airport (NWI)

LocationThe airport is situated just over three miles (5km) north of the city of Norwich.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)844 748 0112.

Getting to city

Abellio Greater Anglia and East Midlands Trains run rail services to Norwich city, and the Norwich rail station is located in the city centre, which can be accessed by either taxi or bus. Local buses offer a service from Cromer Road, which is within walking distance of the airport, to the city centre.

Car Rental

Car rental companies operating at the airport include Avis, Hertz and Europcar.

Airpor Taxis

Norwich Airport Taxis are the official taxi service operating at the airport and the taxi rank is located adjacent to the main terminal building.

Airport Facilities

Facilities at the airport include foreign exchange, an executive lounge, an airport hotel, first aid facilities, information counter, duty-free shopping, a café, and a bar and cafeteria. Note that the airport is a smoke-free zone.

Car Parking

Short-term parking is £4 per day. Long-term parking costs £57.50 for 15 days.

Websitewww.norwichairport.co.uk


Blackpool International Airport (BLK)

LocationThe airport is located three miles (5km) southeast of Blackpool city centre.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October).
Contacts

Tel: +44 (0)125 334 3434 or 0844 482 7171.

Getting to city

There are various transport options to and from the airport. Car rental companies operate from the airport and there are buses and trams available at the airport entrance. Taxis are available from outside the terminal building and the Squires Gate Railway Station is a five-minute walk from the airport.

Car Rental

Car rental companies serving the airport include Hertz, Europcar and Avis.

Airpor Taxis

There are taxis available from the airport and the taxi rank is located just outside the terminal building. There is also a freephone available next to the public telephone that can be used to request a taxi.

Airport Facilities

Duty-free shopping, as well as food and beverage outlets, are available at the airport. There is also a Bureau de Change located opposite the check-in counter.

Car Parking

Departing passengers are entitled to 15 days free parking at the airport and the first 15 minutes are also free for any pick-up and drop-off parking, after which rates are charged on a time scale.

Depature TaxNone
Websitewww.blackpoolinternational.com


Southampton International Airport (SOU)

LocationThe airport is located in Hampshire, a few miles outside of Southampton,
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 from last Sunday in March to Saturday before last Sunday in October).
Contacts

+44 (0)23 8062 0021

Getting to city

The airport is connected to Southampton Central and other parts of England via several train services, including South West Trains and CrossCountry. The journey to Southampton Central takes approximately 8 minutes, while London is 67 minutes away. There are also buses to downtown Southampton, with the U1C running every 15-20 minutes; the journey takes roughly 35-40 minutes.

Car Rental

The Car Rental Reception Centre is located near the short-term car park, opposite the terminal building. Car rental companies include Hertz, Avis, Europcar, National, Alamo, and Enterprise.

Airpor Taxis

Checker Cabs are available 24 hours a day from the taxi desk in the main concourse, near the exit. Prices are fixed in advance, and bookings can be made online or by calling +44 (0) 2380 627 100.

Airport Facilities

Airport facilities include a duty-free shop, currency exchange, internet cafes, and several restaurants both before and after security.

Car Parking

Short-term and long-term parking is available.

Websitewww.southamptonairport.com


Humberside Airport (HUY)

LocationHumberside Airport is located at Kirmington, 12 miles (19km) west of Grimsby and around 15 miles (24km) from both Kingston upon Hull and Scunthorpe.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October).
Getting to city

The Stagecoach 'Humber Flyer' operates approximately once per hour, Monday to Saturday, between Cleethorpes, Grimsby, Humberside Airport, Barton and Hull. Fares are £3.20 to Grimsby (£5.80 return) and £4.50 to Hull (£6.90 return). Barnetby Train Station is located three miles (4.8km) from the airport, and is served by TransPennine Express and East Midlands Trains.

Car Rental

Avis and Europcar have desks in the Arrivals area of the terminal.

Airpor Taxis

Cable Taxis has a desk located in the terminal building.

Airport Facilities

The airport features ATMs and currency exchange facilities, a travel agency, several restaurants and bars, shops, an executive lounge, an airport hotel, and information desk.

Car Parking

Short-term parking is located in Car Park 1. The first 15 minutes are free, thereafter the rates are £4.50 for an hour and £8.50 for two hours, up to £30 per day. Long-term rates are charged at £35.75 for one day, £36.85 for two days, £41.25 for three days, £66.55 for one week, £106.15 for 15 days, and £4.50 per day thereafter.

Websitewww.humbersideairport.com


Kent International Airport (MSE)

LocationKent International Airport is located at Manston in Kent, England, 13 miles (20km) northeast of Canterbury.
Time DifferenceLocal time in the United Kingdom is GMT (GMT +1 from last Sunday in March to Saturday before last Sunday in October).
Getting to city

Stagecoach Bus has regular service between the airport and Ramsgate, Broadstairs and Birchington on buses 38 and 38A. Service number 11 also runs to Canterbury, Wingham, and Westwood Cross Shopping Centre. Trains operated by National Rail and Southeastern Rail can be caught from Ramsgate, the station is best reached by a short taxi ride.

Car Rental

Avis operates an office from Manston Airport.

Airpor Taxis

Taxis are available for hire outside the terminal building, and there is a Central Cars freephone available in the terminal.

Airport Facilities

The terminal features several cafés and bars, duty-free shopping, and an executive lounge.

Car Parking

Parking is charged at a single rate. The first 15 minutes are free, 30 minutes is £1, one hour is £2.50, two hours is £3. One day is £10, two days is £18, three days is £22, one week is £34, nine days is £38, and each day thereafter is an additional £2.

Websitewww.manstonairport.com


Durham Tees Valley Airport (MME)

LocationDurham Tees Valley Airport is located just east of Darlington, North East England.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1 between the last Sunday in March and the Saturday before the last Sunday in October).
Getting to city

Arriva Bus 12 operates from the airport to Darlington, from there passengers can catch trains to Durham, Newcastle, and York.

Car Rental

Avis, Europcar and Hertz operate car hire facilities at the airport.

Airpor Taxis

Taxis are located directly outside the terminal building.

Airport Facilities

Airport facilities include ATMs, baby-changing stations, first aid facilities, as well as shopping and dining facilities.

Car Parking

Short-stay parking is free for three hours, £5 for up to eight hours, £10 for up to 10 hours, £15 for twelve hours, and £20 for 24 hours. Long-term parking is available, however it is advisable to pre-book via the airport website.

Websitewww.durhamteesvalleyairport.com


Newquay Cornwall Airport (NQY)

LocationThe airport is situated four and a half miles (7.5km) northeast of Newquay, on Cornwalls north coast.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1, Apr - Oct)
Contacts

General airport enquiries: +44 01637 860 600.

Getting to city

Bus 556 travels between central Newquay and the airport roughly every hour, and authorised airport taxis and rental cars are also available. There are train stations near the airport.

Car Rental

Europcar and Hertz are represented at the airport.

Airpor Taxis

Coastal Travel Cornwall is the official taxi provider at the airport. The company has a desk in Arrivals. It is not generally necessary to book a taxi in advance, but you will receive a discount for doing so. It costs about £15 for a pre-booked taxi to Newquay.

Airport Facilities

Newquay is a small but comfortable airport, with only basic facilities. Two coffee bars, an executive lounge, free wifi and facilities for the disabled are available at the airport.

Car Parking

Parking is available at the airport. Substantial discounts are available for those who book online in advance.

Depature TaxA £5 Airport Development Fee is required from all departing passengers over the age of 16.
Websitewww.newquaycornwallairport.com


Exeter International Airport (EXT)

LocationThe airport is situated four miles (6km) east of the city of Exeter.
Time DifferenceGMT (GMT +1, Apr - Oct)
Contacts

Airport Customer Service: +44 01392 367 433.

Getting to city

Bus Service 56 (56A and 56B), operated by Stagecoach, offers regular connections between the airport and Exeter, although service is reduced on Sundays and Bank Holidays. Authorised airport taxis and rental cars are also available.

Car Rental

Car rental companies represented at the airport include Avis, Budget, Europcar and Hertz.

Airpor Taxis

Apple Central Taxis is the official airport taxi company. Taxis can be found at the taxi stand outside Arrivals.

Airport Facilities

Airport facilities include shops (including duty-free), cafes, a restaurant, a bar, ATMs, currency exchange, conference rooms and an Executive Lounge.

Car Parking

Plentiful short-term and long-term parking is available and can be booked online or by telephone, although it is generally not necessary to reserve parking in advance.

Websitewww.exeter-airport.co.uk


Castle Keep and New Castle


Originally known as Monkchester, Newcastle only got its present name when Robert Curthose, son of the infamous William the Conqueror, built his 'New Castle' on the site of the Roman fort Pons Aeliu in 1080. Used as a point of defence, the castle was originally built of wood and timber, b
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Castle Keep ©Glen Bowman



Barber Institute of Fine Arts


Praised by as 'one of the finest small art galleries in Europe', the vivid red walls of the enchanting Barber Institute of Fine Arts are adorned with some of the most celebrated art from the 13th to 20th centuries. Browsing the robust artworks, visitors are treated to the timeless talen
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Barber Institute interior ©Barber Institute



Madame Tussauds


Madame Tussauds is the most famous wax museum gallery in the world, with more than 400 life-sized models of stars, famous politicians, royals, comic book characters and sportsmen, as well as exhibits presenting the most infamous criminals the world has known. Inside the museum, the 'Spir
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Madame Tussauds and the London Planetarium ©SkErDi&Ana



Tower of London


The Tower of London is perhaps as famous for its traditions as its imposing structure, located on the Thames River. It is guarded by a special band of Yeoman Warders, known as Beefeaters, and dotted with several large, black birds - the ravens. Legend has it that if the ravens ever leave
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White Tower, Tower of London ©Bernard Gagnon



Abbey Road Studios


The Beatles' 1969 album Abbey Road was recorded at this unassuming studio in St John's Wood, London. While many other famous bands, including Pink Floyd, The Red Hot Chili Peppers, U2, Kate Bush, Radiohead, Oasis and Sting, all recorded tracks here, it is almost always the Beatles fans w
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Abbey Road, London ©Aaron Webb



Speakers Corner at Hyde Park


Located right in the middle of London, Hyde Park is a huge patch of green and blue tranquillity in the midst of the bustling city. Covering 350 acres, it features restaurants, fountains, monuments and flower gardens, and offers a range of activities including ice skating, swimming, boati
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Speakers Corner ©Tom T



Tate Modern


Housed in the former Bankside Power Station, which has been transformed by Swiss Architects Herzog & de Meuron into a spectacular new modern building, the Tate Modern is Britain's greatest museum of modern art. It showcases an exhaustive collection, featuring works from 1900 to the prese
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Tate Modern, London ©Christine Matthews



National Gallery


The National Gallery has an imposing and regal façade stretching across the northern side of Trafalgar Square, and houses over 2,300 paintings from every major European school of painting from the 13th to the 19th centuries. It was opened in 1938 at its present location, which was chose
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National Gallery ©Rudolf Schuba



British Museum


The British Museum is widely regarded as the world's greatest museum of human history and culture. Containing more than 13 million artefacts from all corners of the globe, the British Museum boasts an overwhelming collection of fascinating objects. Most prized among its collection are it
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British Museum ©Paul Micallef



London Eye


At 443ft (135m) tall, and weighing more than 250 double-decker buses, the London Eye is a truly spectacular feature of London's skyline. Offering incredible views of most of London's major attractions, and an opportunity to put the city's geography into perspective, it is a must-see attr
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London Eye at night ©Tunliweb



Shakespeares Globe Theatre


Situated on the bank of the Thames, just 656ft (200m) from the site of Shakespeare's original Globe Theatre, this fantastic recreation will transport visitors back to the time of the very first productions of Hamlet, Romeo and Juliet and Twelfth Night. The reconstruction took a total of
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The Globe Theatre ©GaryReggae



Buckingham Palace and the Queens Gallery


No visit to London would be complete without experiencing the pomp and ceremony of the Changing of the Guard at Buckingham Palace, but now visitors can actually get a peek inside during the annual summer opening of the State Rooms, and see some of the Queen's private art collection at th
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Harrods


Harrods, which proprietor Mohamed Al Fayed calls his 'Palace in Knightsbridge', promises one of the most extravagant and luxurious shopping experiences in the world. With 22 restaurants, and a wide range of departments and services across its seven floors, it is easy to see why this is t
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Harrods, London ©Targeman



Camden Market


Camden Market is one of the most exciting shopping experiences London has to offer. Even if you're just browsing, Camden Market is still definitely worth a visit for its huge variety of food, antiques, bric-a-brac and clothing stalls, bars, nightspots and crowds of people ranging from th
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Camden Market, London ©Grim23



Greenwich


Greenwich is the home of the Greenwich (or Prime) Meridian, which splits the globe into East and West, and is responsible for setting the world clock on zero degrees longitude. Apart from this curious distinction (which has earned Greenwich UNESCO World Heritage Site status), Greenwich h
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The Cutty Sark, Greenwich



London Dungeons


Take a trip through London's dark and gruesome history, meet Jack the Ripper and see what became of his victims, or see the chaos and destruction caused by the great fire of London. The London Dungeon brings history's most notorious killers and evildoers back to life in an experience def
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London Dungeon ©www.CGPGrey.com



St Pauls Cathedral


The great dome of St Paul's Cathedral has been a distinctive landmark on the London skyline for centuries. Built in 1673 by Sir Christopher Wren, after the previous St Paul's was burnt to the ground during the Great Fire of London, it is the greatest of several cathedrals dedicated to St
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St. Paul's Cathedral. ©pocar



Piccadilly Circus


Surrounded by neon advertising and fast-food restaurants, Piccadilly Circus is London's answer to New York's Times Square and, at the junction of Piccadilly, Regent Street and Shaftesbury Avenue, it is the gateway to the West End. With its highly accessible tube station, Piccadilly Circu
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Piccadilly Circus, London ©Onecanadasquarebishopsgatecommons



Brighton Lanes


Brighton is unquestionably England's most spectacular seaside resort town. Made popular in the 18th century, when the Prince Regent (later King George IV) chose it as the site for his holiday palace (the bizarre and fantastic onion-shaped Brighton Pavilion), it is still famous for its fr
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Brighton Royal Pavilion, England ©Xgkkp



Canterbury


The historic cathedral city of Canterbury, with its narrow streets and walkways, is best explored on foot. It is the home of Christianity in England, and has been the ultimate destination for pilgrimages in England for centuries, as described in Chaucer's famous Canterbury Tales. The imp
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Canterbury Cathedral



Leeds Castle


Set above a lake in a picturesque valley near the town of Maidstone in Kent, with imposing battlements and a 500-hectare Tudor garden, Leeds Castle proudly describes itself as 'the loveliest castle in the world'. Once a residence of British Queens and a playground for King Henry VIII, it
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Leeds Castle ©Adusha



Windsor Castle


The charming town of Windsor sits on the River Thames, 20 miles (32km) west of London, and is dominated by the magnificent Windsor Castle, the world's largest and oldest occupied castle. The castle was built by William the Conqueror almost a thousand years ago, and has been lived in by E
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Windsor Castle ©visitingeu



Hampton Court Palace


Situated on the banks of the River Thames, 14 miles (23km) southwest of London, Hampton Court is perhaps the most spectacular royal palace in England, and makes a wonderful day-trip destination from the capital. The palace was built by Cardinal Wolsey in the early 1500s, but later it bec
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Hampton Court Palace ©Andreas Tille



Stonehenge


No other site in England presents the viewer with such grandeur and mystery, nor sparks the imagination so much as this iconic circle of stones in Wiltshire, southwest England. Writers, adventurers, historians and conquerors have all tried to answer the question, 'Who built Stonehenge?',
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Stonehenge ©Paul Micallef



The Eden Project


The Eden Project's aim is to examine the ways in which human beings interact with their environment, with a special focus on the plant world, in order to develop new ways of sustainable development by spearheading new conservation methods. Owned by a charity called the Eden Trust, the pr
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The Eden Project, Southwest England ©A1personage



Salisbury Cathedral


The city of Salisbury is dominated by the spire of its famous cathedral, the tallest in England at 404 feet (123m). Started in 1220, the cathedral was completed in 1258, and the Spire added a few years later. Built to reflect the glory of God in stone and glass, this majestic and awe-ins
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Salisbury Cathedral ©Andrew Dunn



Sudeley Castle


Set against the beautiful backdrop of the Cotswold Hills, Sudeley Castle is steeped in history. With royal connections spanning a thousand years, it has played an important role in the turbulent and changing times of England's past. The castle was once home to Queen Katherine Parr (1512-
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Sudeley Castle and pond ©rcstanley



Warwick Castle


Warwick Castle's origins date back to before 1066, and although not used as a Royal residence but rather as the seat of the Earls of Warwick, its history is tied inextricably to the throne through the influence held by the castle's lords. Today, the castle is owned by the Tussaud's Group
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Warwick Castle ©Mcselede



Alton Towers


Alton Towers is the UK's premier theme park aimed at the thrill-seeking and young-at-heart, and can be a welcome excursion for those who have overdosed on the culture and tranquillity of the Cotswolds. Rides with names such as Nemesis, The Blade, Submission and Ripsaw are definitely not
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Alton Towers ©rogerbarker2



University of Cambridge


The University of Cambridge is one of the oldest in the world and is made up of 31 colleges, each an independent institution with its own property and income. The oldest college, Peterhouse, was founded in 1281 by the Bishops of Ely. Both Charles Darwin and John Milton were students at C
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King's College, Cambridge



Norfolk Broads


Much of the area east of Norwich is criss-crossed with a series of navigable inland waterways, known as the Norfolk Broads. The area has become a popular holiday retreat for visitors hiring houseboats and cruisers to tour these waterways, which wind through quaint towns and offer fantast
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The Norfolk Broads ©Acme, Cristobal Palma Photography



Holkham Hall


Holkham Hall is home to the Earl and Countess of Leicester, with the property being in the Coke family's possession since 1609. The formidable 18th-century Palladian Hall is the centre of a 25,000-acre estate on the north coast of Norfolk. Within the house are some magnificent state room
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Holkham Hall ©Nigel Jones



Blickling Estate


Blickling Hall is a splendid early 17th-century house owned by the National Trust. It is one of England's great Jacobean houses and is built in red brick with a gabled façade and elegant corner turrets. Its long gallery has an outstanding plaster ceiling and houses a superb library cont
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Blickling Hall



Roman Baths


The Romans were the first to capitalise on the only natural hot springs in Britain, but it is believed that they were a local attraction long before the building of Rome. These ancient baths were once considered the finest in the Roman Empire, but in the middle ages fell into disrepair.
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Great Bath ©Diego Delso



Berkeley Castle


Berkeley (pronounced 'barkly') is a perfectly preserved 840-year-old castle with a keep, dungeon and splendid staterooms with original tapestries, furniture and silver. The castle was most famously the scene of King Edward II's gruesome murder in 1327. It is believed that Edward was depo
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A Litholint of Berkeley Castle ©F.W. Hulme



Stratford-Upon-Avon


The quaint and picturesque country town of Stratford-Upon-Avon (which, as its name suggests, rests on the banks of the River Avon) is the historic birthplace of William Shakespeare. Visitors can explore Shakespeare's birthplace, Mary Arden's House (where his mother lived before marrying
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Sratford-Upon-Avon ©Kev747



Building of Bath Museum


The fascinating story of Georgian Bath is wonderfully presented by the Building of Bath Museum. The museum is the natural place to start any sightseeing expedition of Bath. It is housed in the Gothic-styled Countess of Huntingdon's Methodist Chapel, which was built in 1765 and renovated
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Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon ©Tagishsimon



Herschel Museum of Astronomy


Distinguished astronomer William Herschel used a telescope he built himself to discover the planet Uranus in 1781, thus securing his place in history as one of the greatest astronomers of all time. His observations, and the telescopes that he built, doubled the known size of the solar sy
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William Herschel ©Lemuel Francis Abbott



Fashion Museum


Bath's comprehensive Fashion Museum brings alive the story of fashion over the last 400 years, from the late-16th century to the present day. The huge collection is fetchingly displayed on hundreds of dummies, providing a chronological journey through changing styles over the centuries.
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Museum of Costume, Bath ©Museum of Costume



Jane Austen Centre


Bath's best-known resident, Elizabethan novelist Jane Austen, is celebrated in this permanent exhibition which showcases her life and work. Bath was her home between 1801 and 1806, and her love and knowledge of the city is reflected in her novels Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, which ar
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Jane Austen Centre, Bath ©Fahdshariff



Bodleian Library


Chief among Oxford's many academic and architectural attractions is the unique Bodleian Library, which is spread throughout several buildings across the city. The central core of this collection of buildings is set in Radcliffe Square, and includes the historic Duke Humfrey's Library, da
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Bodleian Library ©Ozeye



Ashmolean Museum


The Ashmolean Museum houses a fascinating and extensive collection of art and archaeology covering four thousand years of history, ranging from the ancient civilisations of Egypt, Greece and Rome to the 20th century. Exhibitions include sculpture, ceramics, musical instruments and painti
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The Ashmolean Museum ©markhillary



Christchurch Picture Gallery


Christchurch, one of Oxford's most renowned university colleges, possesses an important collection of about 300 paintings and 2,000 drawings, mainly by the Italian masters. Works by Leonardo, Michelangelo, Raphael and Rubens are to be seen here, along with examples from Van Dyck, Frans H
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Christchurch College ©jimmyharris



Carfax Tower


The photo opportunity afforded from the top makes it completely worth climbing the 99 stairs of the Carfax Tower in the centre of Oxford's shopping district. The tower-top is the best place from which to view the 'dreaming spires' of this architecturally beautiful city. The tower is the
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Carfax Tower ©Wikityke



Oxford Botanic Gardens


The oldest botanical garden in the country, Oxford's enormous collection of more than 7,000 species of plants has been growing for four centuries. It was founded as a 'physic garden' by the Earl of Danby in 1621, but today the Oxford Botanic Garden's biodiversity is renowned for being ev
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The Botanic Gardens in Oxford ©simononly



Hadrians Wall


In order to separate the Roman Empire in Britain from the native 'barbarians,' Emperor Hadrian ordered the building of an impressive wall in the year 122. Taking approximately six years to complete, the wall stretches for roughly 80 miles (120km) from South Shields to Ravenglass, passing
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Part of Hadrian's Wall ©Alun Salt



Peak District


The Peak District was England's first national park. This beautiful region sits in the central and northern parts of England, largely within the picturesque county of Derbyshire. Diverse landscapes, abundant wildlife and a rich historic heritage combine with busy market towns and thrivin
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Chatsworth Estate, Peak District, ©Paul Collins



Old Trafford


Nicknamed the 'Theatre of Dreams', Old Trafford has since 1878 been home to Manchester United, England's premier football club. More than 200,000 visitors come each year to marvel at the home of the likes of Ryan Giggs and Wayne Rooney, and to share in some of the famous 'Man U magic'. G
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Old Trafford football ground ©Wiki CC



Tate Liverpool


The Tate Liverpool is home to the biggest collection of modern art in the UK outside of London, and a browse through its galleries is always an afternoon well spent. Situated in Liverpool's historic Albert Dock in a converted warehouse, the gallery has an impressive collection of 20th an
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Tate Liverpool ©G-Man



BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art


The BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Arts is a unique and fascinating collection of ever-changing exhibits, set in an old flourmill on the south bank of the River Tyne. The biggest gallery of its kind, the Centre allows visitors to explore the innovative and unusual world of top contempora
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BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art ©phototram



Castle Howard


Award-winning Castle Howard is one of York's most striking attractions. Home to the Howard family for over 300 years, the castle took 100 years to build, outliving several architects, craftsmen and three earls, before eventually becoming the setting for the popular TV series, Brideshead
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Castle Howard ©John Nicholson



York Minster


For over a thousand years, York Minster has been the principal place of worship in York and its surrounding areas. The largest Gothic cathedral in Europe, this impressive building is open to the public and visitors can enjoy the peace and beauty of the interior of the church and its many
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York Minster ©Paul Wordingham



Jorvik Viking Centre


Set on a 'Viking Dig' archaeological site, the Jorvik Viking Centre is a fascinating exploration of the Viking presence in York over 1,000 years ago. Between 1976 and 1981, the York Archaeological Trust excavated thousands of Viking-era objects, including wooden houses, alleyways and fen
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Vikings ©York Tourism Bureau



York Dungeons


Not for the faint-hearted, the York Dungeons present a fascinating journey back in time, and visitors are guaranteed a ghoulish, grisly experience that will be hard to forget. With attractions that run the gamut from the plague-riddled streets of 14th-century York, to the Labyrinth of th
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Doctor's Assistant at the York Dungeons ©Tokyo Butterfly



Museum of Science and Industry


It may not seem like everybody's cup of tea, but the Manchester Museum of Science and Industry is a truly fascinating and varied collection of exhibits, displays and more, that will appeal to visitors of all ages. Fifteen different galleries crammed full of interesting items are housed i
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Exterior of the Museum of Science and Industry



Bridgewater Hall


Situated on an arm of the Bridgewater Canal, the world-class, £42-million concert venue of Bridgewater Hall holds over 250 performances a year and is home to one of Britain's longest-running orchestras, the Hallé Orchestra. This architecturally striking building can house just under 2,
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Bridgewater Hall ©Alan Stanton



Chatsworth House


Home to the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, Chatsworth House is one of Europe's greatest private houses. It is set on the River Derwent in the Peak District National Park. The estate comprises the 16th-century house, a 1,000-acre park, a farmyard, miles of free walking trails and spectac
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Chatsworth House ©Rob Bendall



Beatles Story Experience


For Beatles fans, The Beatles Story Experience is an absolute must. Set in the trendy and historic Albert Dock building, The Beatles Story allows visitors to trace the development of the Fab Four, from their early days playing in Hamburg to the mass hysteria of Beatlemania, the eventual
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John, Paul, George and Ringo, 1964 ©Creative Commons



Merseyside Maritime Museum


The fascinating Merseyside Maritime Museum traces the history and development of the city of Liverpool as a major port. The museum houses a range of collections, from an exhibition on the tragic and brutal transatlantic slave trade (in which Liverpool played a major role), to artworks re
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Merseyside Maritime Museum ©Man vyi



Speke Hall


On the edge of an industrial estate and just minutes away from the Liverpool Airport, the half-timbered black and white Speke Hall is a piece of history tucked in among modern-day Liverpool. Once on the brink of ruin, this purportedly haunted 450-year-old Tudor house is now a popular Liv
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Speke Hall and gardens ©bmjames



Bristol Cathedral


In roughly 1140, the Abbey of St Augustine was founded by Robert Fitzhardinge. Over the years, the abbey was altered, eventually becoming the model of the 'Hall Church' style in England. When the abbey was finally dissolved in 1539, the nave was demolished and rebuilt, and became what is
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Bristol Cathedral



Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery


The Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery is an impressive collection of exhibits, objects and artwork, housed in a beautiful Edwardian Baroque building. As well as the permanent exhibits of regional, national and international artefacts, the museum hosts a range of temporary exhibitions a
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A Biplane replica ©Arpingstone



Durham Cathedral


Celebrated, together with Durham Castle, as one of Britain's first UNESCO World Heritage Sites, Durham Cathedral is one of the finest examples of Norman architecture in England. Building began on the church in 1093, and it was largely completed after about 40 years. An icon of northeast
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Durham Castle and Cathedral ©Neitram



Durham Heritage Centre


Durham's colourful local history museum is housed in a medieval church, offering some interactive, fun and interesting exhibits that detail the story of Durham, from ancient times to the present day. Situated close to the UNESCO-listed cathedral and castle, the Durham Heritage Centre con
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Durham Heritage Centre ©Jungpionier



Fowlers Yard Creative Workspaces


A row of stables along the River Wear close to the historic heart of Durham has been converted into a set of creative workspaces, where local artists can be seen at work. Visitors can watch crafts like woodcarving, glasswork, painting, micro brewing, embroidery and textile arts in progre
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An artist at work ©Neil T



Crook Hall


Durham's beautiful, Grade 1-listed medieval manor house, Crook Hall, dates from around the 13th century, and is a short distance from the town centre. The house and magnificent gardens are open to the public, and cream teas are served in a pretty courtyard in summer, or in front of a roa
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Crook Hall ©Les Hull



Durham Castle


Few buildings in the world can claim to have been in constant use for more than 900 years, but the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Durham Castle is one of them. It was originally built in the 11th century (opposite Durham Cathedral), to protect the bishop from 'barbaric northern tribes' in
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Durham Castle ©Robin Widdison



Armley Mills Industrial Museum


The Armley Mills Industrial Museum was a working cloth mill until 1969, when the City Council turned it into an award-winning industrial museum. In fact, it was once the world's largest wool mill. Exhibits trace the history of textiles, clothing, engineering and locomotive manufacture in
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Armley Mills Industrial Museum sign ©russelljsmith



Thackray Museum


There is surely no more interesting day out in Leeds than a visit to the Thackray Museum, which tells the story of medical advances through the ages. A recreated Victorian street, complete with sights, sounds and smells, highlights the lives, ailments and treatment of a bygone era in viv
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Thackray Museum ©Richard Thomson



Leeds Art Gallery


In the heart of the city, the Leeds Art Gallery offers a feast for art lovers, its collections covering everything from traditional prints, watercolours, paintings and sculpture to weird and wonderful contemporary works. The gallery is renowned for having the best collection of British a
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Visitors at the Leeds Art Gallery ©Paul Stevenson



Royal Armouries Museum


This fun, lively museum contains six themed galleries (covering War, Tournaments, Self-Defence, Hunting, Oriental Weaponry and the new and attractive Hall of Steel), and is filled with interactive displays, dramatic interpretations, action scenarios and some really exciting exhibits. Thi
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Royal Armouries Museum ©Emeraude



Abbey House Museum


The entertaining Abbey House Museum is contained in the gatehouse of the picturesque, ruined Kirkstall Abbey, dating from 1152. Abbey House allows visitors to walk around the streets of 1880s Leeds, while the upstairs section features galleries detailing the history of Kirkstall Abbey an
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Abbey House Museum



Ducal Mansion (Nottingham Castle)


Towering over the city centre of Nottingham is a magnificent 17th-century mansion, built on a sandstone outcrop (Castle Rock) on the site of the original medieval castle erected by William the Conqueror in 1067. The castle building now houses the city's finest art collection, and a small
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Nottingham Castle and bridge ©alistairmcmillan



City of Caves


A system of man-made caves carved into the sandstone beneath the city of Nottingham has been developed into a modern, award-winning attraction known as The City of Caves. Anglo-Saxons originally inhabited the caves, and their lifestyle is depicted in dramatic presentations for visitors w
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Medieval Tannery ©Mutt



Sherwood Forest


Accessed by the A614 highway, Sherwood Forest makes a great getaway close to Nottingham city. Rather reduced from the green splendour it evinced in the days of Robin Hood, Sherwood Forest is nevertheless as ecologically important and interesting as it is historically. Around 500,000 visi
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The Major Oak in Sherwood Forest ©closelyobserved.co m



Cresswell Crags


A short distance from the M1 motorway near Nottingham is an ancient limestone gorge, honeycombed with caves, where archaeologists have found traces of Ice Age inhabitants who lived here up to 50,000 years ago. The Cresswell Crags are a rare site, featuring Britain's only known Ice Age-er
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Caves at Creswell Crags ©Henrylisatom



Balti Triangle


Any visit to Birmingham is not complete without visiting the city's 'curry capital' and sampling its unique Balti fare. Originating from the large Kashmiri population, the Balti dish was officially discovered in 1976. The word 'balti' means 'bucket', and refers to the round-bottomed pan,
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Balti Cuisine ©Miansari66



Selfridges Store


A Birmingham landmark, the Selfridges store at the Bull Ring Market boasts a stylish design, proving that contemporary architecture can thrive outside trendy London. Designed by Future Systems' architects, the knobbly silver façade was inspired by Paco Rabanne's chain mail dresses. Cons
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Selfridges exterior ©Birmingham Municipality



Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery


Boasting part of the largest collection of Pre-Raphaelite paintings and drawings in the world, the breathtaking works of luminaries such as Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Edward Burne Jones can be found at the Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery. The spectacular Waterhall Gallery of Modern Art
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Birmingham Museum ©JimmyGuano



Drayton Manor Theme Park


A short drive from Birmingham's city centre, the Drayton Manor Theme Park offers an exhilarating alternative to shopping and sightseeing. Loaded with more than 50 rides offering high-octane thrills, the English media has lauded the park as having 'Britain's scariest rides'. Visitors can
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Drayton Manor Theme Park ©Steve Daniels



Brighton Palace Pier


As you step foot onto Brighton's Palace Pier, you are overwhelmed by the sound of repetitive arcade music and the inviting scent of popcorn or fried fish. A row of stalls selling fast-food, toys and souvenirs leads visitors towards the arcade, which is filled with an assortment of gaming
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Brighton Palace Pier ©Ed.ward



Royal Pavilion


The Royal Pavilion was built in stages between 1787 and 1823 as a pleasure palace for British royalty and remains one of Brighton and Hove's chief tourist attractions. The interior of the Royal Pavilion is extraordinary in its combination of exotic Asian and 'oh-so-British!' design. Clas
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Brighton Royal Pavilion ©llamnudds



West End Shows


There are always plenty of child-friendly musicals and shows playing on London's West End, perfect for family holidaymakers looking to soak up some of the great atmosphere of London's Theatre District. Some West End favourites include The Lion King, Roald Dahl's and Shrek: the Musical,
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Aladdin and Jasmine ©Loren Javier



Hamleys


Children will love visiting this world-renowned toy store, located in the heart of London on famous, bustling Regent Street. Hamleys is one of the world's largest toy stores, with six floors of magical, cutting-edge toys and games. The store draws over five million visitors each year and
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Hamleys ©Sheep Purple



London Zoo


Boasting a plethora of exciting, cute and fuzzy animals from over 750 species, the London Zoo is a must for all children and animal lovers. Kids will love the Animal Adventure area, where they can climb, touch, tunnel and splash their way through the zoo discovering animals along the way
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Lion at London Zoo ©jimbowen0306



London Science Museum


Perfect for inquisitive children, the Science Museum will captivate, educate and thrill kids of all ages. Featuring dozens of state-of-the-art exhibits, the Science Museum also features a 3D IMAX Theatre. The Museum's rotating exhibitions are topical and intriguing ensuring that kids can
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Science Museum ©nyaa_birdies_perch



Chessington World of Adventures


Located in southwest London, Chessington World of Adventures is a theme park and zoo catering to children of all ages. Featuring rides, roller coasters and two water slides, this theme park is best visited during the summer months. The zoo, however, is open all year round. A new 'African
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Dragon\'s Fury at Chessington ©gnislew



Bristol Zoo and Garden


Children will love spending a fun-filled day at the Bristol Zoo and Garden, where more than 450 species of animals can be found. Most of the exhibits are undercover, making this the perfect destination for family outings come rain or shine. Featuring themed habitat areas, kids will be am
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Gorilla ©Creative Commons



Avon Valley Adventure and Wildlife Park


Located in the beautiful Avon Valley, just four and a half miles (7km) from central Bath, Avon Valley Adventure and Wildlife Park is the perfect day out for families with children. Kids can let loose in the adventure playground, which features a junior assault course, a riverside trail,
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Avon Valley Adventure and Wildlife Park ©www.avonvalleycountrypark.com



Longleat


Longleat is a bit of a strange tourist destination, catering simultaneously to two very different markets. On one hand, it is regarded as the best example of high Elizabethan architecture in Britain, and one of the most beautiful stately homes that are open to public tours. The magnifice
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Longleat Maze ©odolphie



Dove Cottage and the William Wordsworth Museum


Legendary English poet William Wordsworth lived in Dove Cottage from 1799 to 1813, after which time he moved down the road to the more upmarket Rydal Mount and Gardens. The Dove Cottage residence was the site of his most creative phase and is home to the Wordsworth Museum, exhibiting man
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Dove Cottage ©Menage a Moi



Grizedale Forest


There are some wonderful things to see and do in Grizedale Forest, located in the Lake District near the village of Hawkshead. Visitors can go hiking or ride mountain bikes along the beautiful sculpture trail, or else peruse the galleries of the Brewery Arts Centre. There are easy walkin
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Grizedale Forest ©Russ McGinn/CC_BY



Hill Top


Hill Top is a working farm formerly owned by Beatrix Potter, the famous author of children's books such as and . The cottage, along with Miss Potter's original furnishings and artworks, has been well preserved, and the quaint garden is still kept as she had made it, with a random selec
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Hill Top ©Chris Brown



Holker Estate


Holker Estate, the home of Lord and Lady Cavendish, is a wonderful attraction for visitors to the Lake District; in fact, it is known as one of the best-loved stately homes in Britain. The elegant Holker Hall and its gardens are open to the public, and there is a fantastic restaurant and
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Holker Estate ©Holker Estate 2008



The Fitzwilliam Museum


The Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge has been described as 'one of the greatest art collections in the UK', and was named 'best small museum in Europe' by the Director of the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC. Setting aside a few hours to explore the museum should be first on ever
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Fitzwilliam Museum ©Andrew Dunn



Kettles Yard


Kettle's Yard is an art lover's dream and one of the finest art galleries in Britain. Originally the private home of Jim Ede (former curator of the Tate), Kettle's Yard houses the impressive art collection that Ede donated to the University of Cambridge in 1966, and the house itself is c
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Art on display at Kettle's Yard ©whistlepunch



Kings College Chapel


Perhaps the most popular attraction in the town of Cambridge is the university itself. Steeped in tradition, Cambridge University is the second-oldest university in England, losing out only to Oxford University. The university's colleges are the main attraction on this beautiful campus.
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The Kings College Chapel in Cambridge ©Tbmynors



The Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences


A popular Cambridge attraction for visitors wishing to learn more about the geology of the area surrounding Cambridge is the University's Sedgwick Museum of Earth Sciences. The museum was opened in 1904 and houses an extensive collection of fossils, rocks, minerals and crystals. Visitors
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Outside the Sedgwick Museum ©Keith Edkins



Church of St Mary the Great


The Great St Mary's Church, as it is locally known, is central to Cambridge and its university life. It is the official university church, and according to university rules, all Cambridge undergraduates must live within a three-mile (5km) radius of the church, while university officers a
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Great St Mary's Church ©huangcjz



Westminster Abbey


This church in the heart of the city is one of London's top tourist attractions, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, and rivals Notre Dame for the accolade of most famous church in the world. Westminster Abbey draws millions of tourists each year, in addition to the locals who worship there ev
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Westminster Abbey ©Mark Ramsay



Big Ben and the Houses of Parliament


Originally built for Edward the Confessor more than 1,000 years ago, the Houses of Parliament, or Palace of Westminster, remained the principal residence of Britain's monarchs for the next 400 years. Thereafter, it became the administrative centre of the country. In 1834 the Great Fire b
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Big Ben ©Tim Morris



Tower Bridge


The twin spires of the iconic drawbridge known as Tower Bridge stand 213 feet (65m) above the Thames River, and form one of the most popular tourist attractions in London. Often mistakenly referred to as London Bridge (which is a bit further upstream), Tower Bridge functions as both a ro
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Tower Bridge ©Miquel C



Victoria and Albert Museum


Originally known as the Museum of Manufacture, the Victoria and Albert Museum (or V&A Museum, as it is popularly known) in London is a veritable treasure-trove of artefacts from cultures around the world. Devoted to art and design, it houses more than 27,000 works, including paintings, p
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V and A Museum ©M.chohan



Windermere


One of the prettiest lakes in Cumbria, Windermere has gathered around it a number of bustling communities offering a lot of fun things to see and do, and has become a very popular tourist destination in the Lake District. The pretty towns that surround the lake offer a number of good res
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Windermere ©jack berry



Gloucester


Gloucester is known primarily as a ceremonial city, and as one of the larger towns in the Cotswolds region. It is home to several popular attractions, including Gloucester Cathedral, whose richly-decorated halls contributed to the set of Hogwarts in the Harry Potter films; Prinknash Abbe
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Gloucester Cathedral ©Saffron Blaze



Norwich


The city of Norwich, the capital of East Anglia, grew to prominence as the primary market town for the fertile surrounding region. The famous Norwich Cathedral is one of the prettiest in England and, along with the ancient Norwich Castle, dominates the city. Once a royal palace, Norwich
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Norfolk Broads yachts ©Robert Henson



Penzance


Penzance is home to much more than Gilbert and Sullivan's famous pirates, though it has a long association with the arts and continues to be a centre for art and music in Cornwall. Originally a market and fishing town, Penzance has a bustling harbour area with a Victorian promenade that
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Penzance ©Robert Cutts



Natural History Museum


The Natural History Museum is one of England's very best tourist attractions. Located on Exhibition Road in South Kensington, the Natural History Museum truly will appeal to everyone, from excitable kids to discerning adults. Housed in a gorgeous Romanesque building, the Natural History
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Natural History Museum ©Gareth Williams



Borough Market


The Borough Market, located on Southwark Street at the southern end of London Bridge, is one of the United Kingdom's premier food markets, and a simply wonderful place to ramble around and find some delicious treats to fuel the day's sightseeing. What distinguishes the Borough Market is
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Borough Market ©Jack Gavigan



Imperial War Museum


An absolute must for history buffs, London's Imperial War Museum endeavours to give visitors an understanding of modern warfare, and an appreciation of its effects on both individuals and societies at large. The Imperial War Museum is, in fact, a 'family' of five museums, three of which
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Imperial War Museum, London ©MilborneOne



Cheddar Gorge


Attracting about 500,000 visitors a year, southwest England's spectacular Cheddar Gorge makes a wonderful daytrip destination, guaranteed to delight lovers of the great outdoors. The limestone gorge, located at the southern end of the Mendip Hills, near the village of Cheddar in Somerset
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Cheddar Gorge ©David Iliff CC-BY-SA 3.0



Castlerigg Stone Circle


One of Britain's most popular and most mysterious attractions, Castlerigg Stone Circle is a must-see for visitors to the Lake District. The Neolithic structure, which is comprised of 38 free-standing stones, some of which reach as high as 10 feet (3m), continues to intrigue eminent archa
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Castlerigg Stone Circle ©Gjoseph



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